All in Abstract

Andrea Mariconti

With a major in visual arts and scenography, Andrea Mariconti’s work is about exploration of raw materials made up of conceptual properties, that emulate nature and organic forms. With a wide range of experiences within the social health sector, Mariconti’s work has since won awards worldwide for his expressive artworks and their transmutation.

Fabio La Fauci

Inspired by surrealism, abstract expressionism and minimalism, Fabio La Fauci’s works oscillate between abstract geometry and organic reality, escaping all attempts at artistic classification. La Fauci’s works’ intrinsic plastic ambiguity enables a transformation from one meaning to another, ultimately derived from his own subconscious.

Gianfranco Meggiato

Using the ’lost wax’ method, Gianfranco Meggiato creates rotational bronze sculptures that are preoccupied with void rather than surface. Internationally renowned for his monumental sculptures, Meggiato’s creations represent the nucleus of life surrounded by space and intangible energy.

Ignacio Muv

Ignacio addresses the potential of painting as a material. His artworks present the painting from its tactile, sensory and virtual dimension; where the dialogue between the painting, the frame and the canvas is direct, suppressing the formal obligations in that relation.

János Huszti

Huszti portrays his models with utmost consequence and creatively precise, and thus reveals the personality of each of his models. Various aspects such as beauty. Sensuality, coolness, distance and aloofness as well as mysteriousness are well reflected in the individual works.

Masaki Yada

Born in Tokyo, Masaki Yada reinterprets spiritual symbolism through his detailed and intricate paintings, simultaneously creating an edgy and dark atmosphere within his works. Investigating the inner self through the Freudian psychology, Yada’s subjects include abstract gestures behind hyperrealistic still life and figurative elements.

Sebastian Herzau

Painting both portraits and landscapes, Sebastian Herzau’s artworks share a common blurred, enigmatic effect through his use of soft pastel colours, veiled layering and subtle distortion. Herzau’s unique approach portrays his subjects with an element of mystery, combined with many layers of paint forming a three-dimensional effect within his work, emphasizing the separation between real space and illusion.